4 Pillars of Success with Pinterest (Driving More Traffic and Sales to Your Website)

By on December 12, 2012

4 Pillars of Success with Pinterest

Do you utilize the power of Pinterest as a marketing method? If not, why not? If yes, how much time are you devoting to it?

Pinterest is becoming extremely popular, growing at a rapid exponential pace, and its picture-based posting style really appeals to the public’s desire to share information visually.

If you’re struggling generating Pinterest traffic, try implementing the 4 pillars of success with Pinterest below and watch how quickly your results improve.

[1] Identify Yourself

You want your Pinterest identity to accurately reflect you and your business. Otherwise, you run the risk of having your Pinterest time devolve into pure recreation. Though it may be fun to repin everything you have a passing interest in and make friends, remember your goals, do your best to monitor your efforts, and put business first.

Create a user name that is professional, easy to remember, and has a correlation with your website or business. Create a keyword-optimized profile that establishes a connection with curious readers and allows them to learn what you’re really about.

For a photo, you can choose a company logo, but a picture of yourself will humanize your efforts. Finally, keep your posts relevant to your niche and make your titles pithy and easily searchable.

[2] Originate

Pinterest is all about pinning and repinning images that people find entertaining and informative. But all those repins have to start somewhere. They should start with you. You want to become the source; the birthplace of those awesome posts that get pinned and pinned again into the virtual atmosphere.

Keep your posts simple yet elegant enough to draw in viewers. Infographics are very popular, but even some inspiring words that stand out against a background can be effective. Be creative. An eye-catching photograph with some relevant text in an appealing font goes a long way. You can also combine several images into one very long pin; Pinterest has no posting limits when it comes to length.

Don’t forget about the power of cartoons. Even if you’re not an artist, a funny animation can really get people’s attention. Finally, subtly add your logo, name, or website in all of your pins to create a sense of consistency.

[3] Form a Community

Remember, though you may be there to generate leads, Pinterest is first and foremost a social networking medium. Put in the effort to become a part of the active Pinterest community.

Don’t go crazy pinning people excessively and don’t become a spammer. Post plenty of your own stuff, but also look for pins that you genuinely enjoy and found helpful/entertaining. Pin them, like them, and credit the appropriate source. Other users will recognize you’re there to contribute to the overall atmosphere, and they will take your self-promotion pins much more seriously.

[4] Tease and Promote

You don’t need to give everything away with a pin. In fact, withholding some valuable information is a great way to pique user curiosity and facilitate click-throughs to your blog. Ask probing questions but don’t reveal the answers. Offer valuable tutorials and deliver what your promise on your landing page.

Experiment with offering tangible promotions and sales in your pins. Don’t forget to include an accurate description that allows searching users to find your posts. And of course, call your potential customers to action just as you would in any other medium.

How Has Pinterest Been Working for Your Business?

Have you had success with Pinterest as a marketing medium? What’s your verdict? A flash in the pan, or a social network that is here to stay?

Let us know with a comment below.

Join Us in the Conversation...

We'd love to know your thoughts on this article.
Meet us over on Facebook, Google+ or Twitter to join the conversation right now!

Adam Toren

About Adam Toren

Adam Toren is an Award Winning Author, Serial Entrepreneur, and Investor. He Co-Founded YoungEntrepreneur.com along with his brother Matthew. Adam is co-author of the newly released book: Small Business, Big Vision: “Lessons on How to Dominate Your Market from Self-Made Entrepreneurs Who Did it Right” and also co-author of Kidpreneurs.